Brown Skin Girl “Harriet” by Crixtover Edwin from Pinterest

The African society generally abhors disrespect. Taking Yoruba culture, for instance, it is disrespectful to call an older person by their first name. The honorifics, aunty, or uncle are preferred. However, when a woman becomes a mother, aunty becomes disrespectful to her. She must be called by her child’s name. That is, she moves from being an Aunty Someone to being a Mummy Someone because her identity as a mother shows a significant change in her societal status.

A woman’s identity in society is so flexible that she is required to go from being a Miss to becoming a Mrs


Toxic masculinity is a patriarchal construct that is terribly harmful to men and women.

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Men who are afraid to feel, keep women around them to do their feeling for them while dismissing us for the same supposedly ‘inferior’ capacity to feel deeply. But in this way also, men deny themselves their own essential humanity, becoming trapped in dependency and fear.”

-Audre Lorde

Toxic masculinity is the harmful behaviour or characteristics that society has attached to men. Simply put, it is what society thinks a man should be. Toxic masculinity is better explained by giving examples — Boys don’t cry, men aren’t allowed to show emotions. …


God can’t be everywhere so he made mothers — how well do we appreciate this saying?

Art by Claudia Tremblay from Pinterest

Just like audacity can be an appropriate synonym for men sacrifice could be said to play the same role for women. The difference is that men feel entitled to their audacity while women are burdened with the duty to make sacrifices.

Young girls are basically trained from childhood to take on a life of servitude and sacrifices for their families. Everyone feels entitled to women’s sacrifices. In the home, she expected to give it all up for her children and her husband. …


Women are not strong if what they are doing is enduring hardship without hope for a way out of it — they are simply suffering.

Photo by JEFERSON GOMES on Unsplash https://unsplash.com/photos/KSoibTNlh58?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditShareLink

I read Pachinko by Min Jin Lee recently and one of the things that spoke to me the most in the book was how much suffering the women had to endure. It reminded me of the role women played in the Biafran War as told by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie in her second novel, Half of a Yellow Sun.

One similarity in both stories is that the women had to take care of their children, their families, and their husbands’ relatives when their husbands were killed or wounded in the war. …


Photo by Billie on Unsplash

One thing the world likes to forget is that women are human beings with different backgrounds, characters, behaviours, and truths. And in a world designed to suit men — women are seen as not more than objects to be acquired and used for the entertainment and pleasure of men. Society pits women who strive to break out of this vicious entrapment against each other like wild animals in a cage.

Sadly, many women have absorbed this indoctrination and see other women as threats, rivals, and competition. Therefore, allowing the patriarchy to successfully weaponize the phrase, ‘women are women’s enemies.’

With…


The Golden Hour by Aminah Dantzler on Pinterest

The words bitter, angry, witch, prostitute, and lesbian amongst many others are thrown at feminists as insults, they are used in an unnatural way to demean a woman who stands up for her rights. Feminists are accused of damaging the core values of society and also of influencing younger generations of women badly.

People tend to forget that these so-called societal core values are hinged on the oppression of women. Women have faced various forms of institutionalized oppression since the beginning of time. …


Image from Pinterest

I’ve been a fan of Kdrama as far back as my secondary school days. I love how they can weave a love story into any setting, hospital, law firm, high school, publishing house, anywhere — Think of a place and there’s probably already Kdrama love story created just for it and there’s also their Sci-fi, fantasy dramas. Koreans are undoubtedly good storytellers.

Another thing I love is how they act with their emotions, they immerse themselves into their roles — it’s so beautiful to see. …


PATRIARCHY IN NOLLYWOOD MOVIES

Photo by Niklas Weiss on Unsplash

I once wrote an article titled ‘How Nollywood Movies Almost Ruined My Life,’ sounds a bit dramatic I know, but it’s not quite far from the truth. As a child, my mother used to rent out Nollywood movies and so my love for Nigerian movies was formed when I was basically a blank slate that absorbed everything that I saw — in this case, everything that I watched and all was cool until I became a feminist… ghen! ghen!

These days it’s like Nollywood is not even trying anymore, especially with Yoruba movies. I am still…


Photo by Miguel Bruna on Unsplash
  1. Feminism was brought to us by white people, it is alien to our culture as Africans.

What? Heck no! Feminism isn’t alien to our culture; for a long time African women have been standing up for themselves. We have examples of great women in Africa, like Queen Amina of Zaria, we have Naa Asantewa of Ashanti Kingdom, we even have the Aba Women riot of 1929, where women refused to be pushovers and fought for their rights. These examples are amongst many others.

So, while in pre-historical Africa, the word feminism was not used, the general concept and idea existed…


Picture from Pinterest

My stance on sex work is and will always be that it is a hustle and no one, especially prostitutes, should be shamed because of it. But do I consider sex work a source of liberation for women?

My answer is No.

Sex work while being back-breaking work doesn’t liberate women in my opinion. It exploits not just the bodies of women but their situations and while many people focus on the glorified parts of sex work, like being a porn star or even owning an Only Fans account, down on the streets, the situation isn’t quite the same.

The…

Aminat Sanni-Kamal

Novelist. Feminist. Creative Writing Teacher. Lawyer

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